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>> the u.n. envoy to syria holds talks with president bashar al- assad and hopes to find a solution to end the violence. hello. the other top stories from al jazeera -- another insider attack in afghanistan. the u.s. contractor is killed. plus -- india's prime minister appeals for calm after a second day of violent street protests. plus, bringing life to the desert. qatar brings ca hopes for those struggling to grow their own food. syria's president bashar al- assad says his government will do whatever it can to end the crisis in syria. his comments on state tv followed a meeting of the u.n. peace envoy to syria lakdar brahimi. he also says he is cooperating with lakdar brahimi, who is on a two-day visit. it coincides with a missile strike. scores of civilians killed in the attack. in the northern city of aleppo rebel fighters say they captured a military base. russia's foreign minister says he received guarantees from president assad he will not use chemical weapons against rebels. >> i met president assad and we exchanged views on the next steps that can be taken to move forward.
for the middle list -- for the middle east here at cnp. we will discuss what is in store for the post-assad syria. mark twain once said that news of my death has been greatly exaggerated. since the spring of 2011, that was probably the case for the assad regime of syria. but in the last couple of months, we have seen things changing. we see robling territory, not just attacking and retreating, but actually holding ground. we have seen the russians equivocating on their support for the assad regime. and we have even seen regime insiders, of the syrian vice- president saying yesterday that the regime cannot win militarily. so the end may finally near for the assad regime, but many questions remain. what would a post-assad government look like? would it be tolerant of the many minority groups in syria? despite the fall of the regime, it has been very tolerant of minorities, except for the kurds. and there's a lot of fear among minorities about what will take place when the assad regime falls. and what happens to the syrian state as a whole? will it break apart? this is not beyond the realm of possib
for weeks laying siege before making the final push tkafrplt thpush today. the regime of bashar al-assad has losing control of the territory in the pass few months. >> many u.s. servicemen are expressing a desire to be with their families. for now they have each other and a pretty nice spread to boot. >> i wish i could be home with family and friends but all the people are so cool. >> this is a time where everyone gets together and shares good food, and laughter, and it's a good time of year. i certainly would like to westbound my family at home but we're serving here in afghanistan for a good cause so i'm happy to be there. >> no soldier left behind. nato forces are due to withdraw from the country on 2014, they are speeding up the efforts to train the afghan military units before they pull out. >> it looks like george h.w. bush will be spending his christmas in the hospital. he has been undergoing treatment for a bronchitis-like cough since november. doctors are cautiously optimistic that president bush's son, former president george w. bush has been among the visitors at the hospital. no
government. both the assad regime and the opposition rejected it because it would involve the two sides sharing power. now they want to revive the plan but is it desirable? >> the reason simply because assad once he begins to loosen the absolute control of he has of everybody around him in the military he is severely weakened and very vulnerable to being killed even by the people around him. so he knows that in the back of his mind. it is all or nothing proposition for him similar to saddam hussein and qaddafi. even the rebels themselves. they have lost 40,000 in this fight and they're not about to share power with anybody. particularly the assad government. i mean these are people they have been fighting now for almost two years. patti ann: yeah. >> so it's not in the cards. patti ann: yeah. and the plan is vague when it comes to assad specifically during that summer meeting in geneva. there was a push to call specifically for assad's ouster but russia opposed that. and as you say, assad is not going to go quietly. russia though very involved. how important is russia's role in all of t
the rebels are certainly getting pounded by bashar al-assad's air force from above and his air force still controls much of the skies. its becoming a particularly critical situation on the ground inside a number of the rebel strongholds because the medical supply shortage is happening. you have these mass casualty events like the bomb eupblgs and therbombings and there is really no way to treat the victims. the rebels are gaining momentum, better armed and organized, better command and control facilities there inside of northern syria and they are trying to push into a number of towns which are controlled by those loyal to president bashar al-assad. this will be a real test for the rebels in the coming weeks because they have been used to mounting their attacks in the relative safety of cities which supported them and now awful a sudden they will be operating in truly hostile environments where they do not have the hearts and minds of the people themselves. the latest reports out of syria, though, show no progress on the diplomatic front. so far the one peace enjoy who has been able to mee
assad in this conflict. they don't really want to deal with the russians, hence turning down the invitation. the rebels now think time is on their side. the momentum is on the battlefield has shifted. for so long the rebels were outgunned and outmaneuvered. they hold major parts of northern part of the syria and major population centers in the center of the country that president assad up till now had control. one rebel fighter said we'll fight all the way to president assad's palace. the rebels don't see a reason to negotiate while president assad is in power. the while the offer from the russians may not be so significant is the fact they're making it is significant. russia has a very critical port along the syrian course along the mediterranean the port of tartuse. russia is trying very hard to keep tear influence inside syria and may be trying to play both sides of the coin here. they want to keep assad so they have influence with him and to hedge their bet to gain as much influence with the syrian rebels so if the rebels win they get to keep the port which is their only
and al assad ending with an exchange of views on the future. he said he set out his position on things. he explained to the syrian president his point of view on how to help the syrian people. the u.n. special envoy expressed concern that the continued fighting. the conflict in syria will continue into the new year. dozens were killed on sunday alone in central syria. army planes apparently bombing people waiting for food outside a bakery. rebels accused the regime of taking anger out on them. there had been increasing concern that they could use chemical weapons to hold on to power. the government refuses they would use chemical weapons. >> they will never use it. and that clear? firstly, they would not use it against the wrong people if they had won with in their geographical boundaries. -- against their own people. >> they claimed they seized this base near aleppo. >> in afghanistan, a police officer shot dead five colleagues in a northern province. >> that officer has been detained. at least 52 members of the force have been killed this year by afghan foreign police. the egyptian c
in syria could reach catastrophic levels now that reports from bashar al-assad military's has loaded lethal chemical weapons into aerial bombs and is awaiting final orders to use them. here to tell us what it means and the economic impact is a former fbi special agent and national security and counterterrorism expert. thanks for coming on tonight. >> thank you. melissa: give us your reaction to the story. it seems like we're reaching a critical point. >> absolutely. this is extremely dangerous and probably one of the reasons secretary clinton agreed to meet with the russian foreign minister and rahim my, the u.n. ambassador for the syrian issue, the syrian dossier. if the regime uses chemical weapons or any weapons of mass destruction, the regime in syria, that is definitely an indication that it is a last act of desperation. melissa: yeah. >> i'm sure that the international community will try to prevent that in any way, shape or form. the syrian, the russian president, putin, a couple of days ago when he was in turkey, he gave some signals that the chemical weapons in syria are secure. so
out the assad regime. now the russians say they are willing to meet with the syrian opposition. it could open the door for real u.n. action on the ground, action that could mean american involvement. we've got more details in a live report in just a minute. >>> but also, russia's president formally saying no to americans who want to adopt russian children. it is a heartbreaking development for hundreds of americans who are trying to adopt children from russian orphana orphanages. that is happening right now. president vladimir putin signed the adoption ban today. sadly, more than 50 americans who were in the final stages of adopting russian children, they are not going to be able to. and while those families certainly hoping that they're going to allow these adoptions to go through, the country's child rights commissioner says that those kids are going to stay in russia. so why are the russians doing this? the ban is considered a payback of sorts for an american law that was passed two weeks ago. that law puts financial restrictions on russians accused of human rights violation
loyal to assad regime. they were allowed to go free after a firefight between captures and rebel forces. it's the dangers of this work. >> it's getting ever more dangerous, with each passing year we have lost 28 journalists in syria this year which rivals the worst, but the story has to be told. we are criticized if we don't tell the story and criticized reckless if we do. if write an editor as richard's story shows, i would not let a reporter go inside at this moment. >> jon: i know you were friend of the early reporters? >> very brave, pioneering reporter and her loss is felt to this day. >> these are the real journalists, who are risking their lives to tell the story. you got at npr who is fearless and edie who is one of the first female journalists in vietnam they deliver the real news. >> at a price that is just becoming too high. if you are responsible for these eports -- peerdz. >> there is a lot of volunteering on it? >> looking back on it. i don't think it's great to do. many journalists, if richard engel, one of the most experienced reporters in the field, its cautionary tale.
, a warning to syrian president bashar al- assad to cease the air strikes and fighting against syrian rubbles that has led into turkish territory. we cannot spend a lot of time worrying about whether that pisses off syria, secretary panetta said later. he said he invited kim jong-un for dinner, he served him a glass of wine and tried to find out how he thinks. he is clearly a complex man. his accomplishments over 74 years span two branches of government, education, and a little bit of farm labor on his california ranch. before taking office as the 23rd secretary of defense, secretary panetta served more than two years as cia director. after three years, chief of staff to president clinton. he and his wife cut directed the leon and sylvia and the institute at cal state university at monterey bay. to promote public service. he served eight terms in congress. rising to chairman of the house budget committee in 1989. then president clinton's director of the office of management and budget to replaced by me in welcoming to the national press club secretary defense leon panetta. [applause] >> thank
to reporters briefly this morning and told them about his discussions with assad. here is more of what mr. brahimi had to say. dana, mr. brahimi has since left syria he says the situation is dire and he hopes they can come to some agreement to alleviate the misery for the syrian people. >> you are on the phone, and lucky enough to get you face to face. thank you for that and for that report. as gruesome and grim as it was. >>> ahead on "starting point" criticism from the right and left. controversy brewing over chuck hagel's possible nomination as defense secretary. will the president go all in or go with someone else? >>> and fired for being simply too irresistible. one state's highest court says not a problem. this is a story you really do have to hear and see to believe. we'll bring it to you, next. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't treat that. really? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms, plus it relieves your runny nose. [ breathes deeply ] awesome. [ male announcer ] yes, it is. that's the cold truth! i need you. i feel so alone. but you're
base. now, more signs that the regime of bashar al assad is crumbling. a live record from the region after this. [ sniffs ] i have a cold. [ sniffs ] i took dayquil but my nose is still runny. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't treat that. really? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms, plus it relieves your runny nose. [ breathes deeply ] awesome. [ male announcer ] yes, it is. that's the cold truth! time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at >>> we have this just in from johannsburg bureau in south africa. we're learning that former south african president nelson mandela has been released from the hospital and he will be goin
speaking to president assad in the wake of another gruesome day. in what the u.n. special envoy to syria rahimi said. "we have exchanged opinions about the possible steps that can we taken in the future. the syrian president spoke about his view regardi the situation. i also talked about the meetings i had in the region and outside the region and i also talked about which steps i see appropriate to be taken to help the syrian people get out of this crisis." this meeting after 100 people who had gone without bread for one week were killed as they lined up at a bakery. the batdeath toll is expected to up. now at 100. syrian warplanes bombed them. you must be warned. the video you are about to see is extremely graphic. >> reporter: a voice filled with horror. a scene full of carnage. a massacre screams the man. they targeted the bakery where hungry syrians lined up to get bread. >> translator: from 200 meter as way i could see corpses. the people could not be described. bodies piled on top of each other. an impossible scene. there is no word to describe it. >> reporter: one of the first on
for the release. rupert murdoch launches into the successor role of news of the world. president bashar al-assad and a cease-fire agreement, negotiated by former u.n. secretary. tens of thousands of people killed since march of last year. the death toll continues climbing almost daily. green on blue insider attacks increasing in afghanistan. one in 50 u.s. and international soldiers killed this year by their afghan partners. it is pop and circumstance for great britain's queen elizabeth ii. china becomes the third country behind the u.s. and russia to use successfully dock and land spacecraft. libya holding its first free election in six years. 2.7 million voters choosing a 200 member assembly, and they draft libya's constitution. after three of the country's power grid's collapse, they experienced the largest blackout in the world. 640 million people without power. london's 2012 summer olympic games proves to be a record-breaking sporting events. michael phelps becomes the most decorated olympian of all time. twenty-two olympic medals. an online anti-muslim film sparking protests around the wor
. [ gunfire ] >>> and the deadly violence goes on in syria. today president bashar al assad's forces are claiming they attacked several rebel operations in the eastern city. meantime, russia's top diplomat and international envoy to syria met in mosquito. they're calling for a -- in moscow. they're calling for a syrian-elderly transition and warning the conflict is becoming more medicilitarized and sectar. >> the conflict is not only more and more militarized, it is also more and more sectarian. and if we are not careful, if the syrians themselves are not careful, it will be a mainly sectarian conflict with really dire consequences for the people of syria. >> moscow has opposed efforts by the u.n. security council to oust the syrian president, a long-time ally. >>> one of the effects as the fiscal cliff gets closer. the hardline tea party is having a harder time holding the line on an absolute pledge not to raise taxes. copd makes it hard to breathe, but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung fun
up fresh talks with president bashar assad said that the two had discussed taking, quote, many steps to help end the violence. ♪ gregg: back in washington, d.c., anxiety is rising over a plan to avert spending cuts and big tax hikes by january 1. the growing number of lawmakers say they are deeply skeptical that a deal can be reached in the next seven days, and we're beginning to hear new reports suggesting the president may have a smaller deal in mind, one that will keep tax rates where they are and, again, put off the issue of spending cuts. chris stirewalt, fox news digital politics editor, host of "power play" on, chris, good to see you. i was reading your recent column, i want to put a portion of it up on the screen, and i'll quote you: gregg: explain what you mean. >> a cheerful christmas thought, gregg. [laughter] merry, merry. no, when we look back at 2012, if you take a minute and look back at the arc of this year in politics, what you saw was the smallest -- it was the most expensive, but it was the smallest presidential election maybe if history. we didn't ta
his ideas at a news conference this weekend. >>> the head of nato says syrian president bashir assad is acting like a desperate regime. he is condemning the syrian military for continuing with opposition forces. he said it justifies nato's mission to overcome turkey. it is a country which borders syria. >> the facts that such missiles are used in syria emphasizes the need for effective defense and protection of our ally, turkey. >> the united states, germany and the necessity netherlands we turkey with 200 personnel. they are expected to deploy the troops and artillery early nextier. >>> japanese government officials are expanding their reach in an economy that has a trusting global interest. they signed a developing agreement with nenya. they have been carrying foreign development after taking steps. representatives of both countries signed a memorandum of understanding, giving japan exclusive rights to develop the two-hour special economic zones. the area is several hours from the largest city. >> i hope that and i'm very confident that the friends shipping to the two countries wil
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)